This is the best really long sentence I have read in years

This is the best really long sentence I have read in years. FB won’t even let me share it in it’s exuberant entirety. Thinking of making an assignment where students experiment with how long they can make a sentence and still have it be a good sentence.
“So that if you’re sitting in the backseat of a late-nineties Pontiac Bonneville, being driven around the Atlanta suburbs so that your boyfriend—“romantic affiliate,” he was calling himself, at the time—can spend time with his boyhood best friend, who works nights and has to pay his probation officer that afternoon, but who then spends the rest of the afternoon trying to hustle your boyfriend/affiliate into footing the bill for a Percocet prescription, which involves a visit to a doctor who will write a prescription for fifty dollars and whose strip mall office bears the sign YOUR FAMILY DOCTOR with the F in FAMILY hanging askew, and then having given up on getting your boyfriend/affiliate to agree to funding said prescription, basically kidnaps your boyfriend and you along on a trip to pick up said prescription, never stopping the car until he parks it at Kroger, where the prescription is not available in an hour as promised, or even an hour later—a delay spent at Hick’ry House eating BBQ and then the Taco Mac sports bar drinking Budweisers, but even so a delay that becomes to your whatever, affiliate, absolutely excruciating, and ends in[…]”
Excerpt From: Dombek, Kristin. “The Selfishness of Others.” Farrar, Straus and Giroux. iBooks.
This material may be protected by copyright.
Check out this book on the iBooks Store: https://itun.es/us/Jcerab.l

An irritating automotive mystery

An irritating automotive mystery. Suddenly at 1:30 AM our car alarm goes off. I went out and turned it off. It went off again. And, a few minutes later, again. I tried getting in, starting the engine, shutting off the engine, and locking the doors. No good.It would go off every couple minutes, so matter how many times we sent the signal not to. This is a serious matter in a rowhouse neighborhood, where you could wake up all your neighbors. Finally I had to disconnect the battery. No idea why this happened. The car had not been driven in 24 hours, so if it underwent some mechanical change (like a wire coming loose) it did so without the car being moved. It is true we were in an accident with that care about 6 weeks ago, and the battery was temporarily jostled, so that it required me to bang on the connection a couple times. But no problem with the alarm. Why would such a thing only manifest itself weeks later?
Tomorrow I shall either have to have the alarm fixed or disconnected. Insurance companies seem to require them. They of course are absolutely useless in preventing theft. Their only legitimate use is for finding the car in a large parking lot or garage. Back before cars had such things, we managed.

I GOT TO UNDERSTAND

I GOT TO UNDERSTAND!
As a household-commodity producer, I got to understand that the impression of a beautiful packaging does not last on a consumer if the product is of little or no quality.
I got to understand that the impression of a nice fragrance or smelling of a product does not last if the product has little or no value.
And I also got to understand that the impression of a captivating adverts and marketing of a product does not stay long if the product fails to deliver.
The same thing is also applicable when it comes to marital relationship. The beautiful looking woman, handsome looking man, nice voice, straight legs, good set of teeth, tall height, long hair, glowing skin, good education, reputable and well paid job, etc. the impression of all these does not last in marriage before you will face the reality of marriage life.
As a married Christian minister, here is my advice for you as a Christian single:
To the single brothers, “Do not be fooled by outward packaging of a woman but focus on virtues and godliness.” Beauty, either natural or artificial, has nothing to do with healthy marriage, but godliness and virtues. Beauty without virtues and godliness is a waste bin.
To the single sisters, “Do not focus on what a man drives but on what drives him.” The Spirit of God that drives a man and the divine vision that drives him are more important than a big car or cash.
Many single men with big televisions have no vision for the future, and also a single man driving nice car without having Spirit of God that drives him will end up in an accidental marriage.
#Wisdomforgodlysingles
RTEM: rtemoutreach.org

THIS GARBAGE PLANNED A TOUR FOR $$

THIS GARBAGE PLANNED A TOUR FOR $$ – I.E. IF YOU’RE A WOMAN WHO DRINKS, DON’T BE SURPRISED IF A GUY LIKE BROCK HAS “20 MINS OF ACTION”(DAD’S WORDS) ON YOUR PASSED OUT BODY – NOW PAY UP.
FUCK DAD, BROCK & THE WHITE MAN WHO RELEASED HIM. REFUSE THIS PIECE OF GARBAGE ON YOUR CAMPUS.

~ Interview with Elijah Ray

~ Interview with Elijah Ray
After a number of amazing encounters with this man and some tantalising conversations I am excited to finally publish this interview.
“I never doubted music as a path, but I doubted if the world is ready for the kind of music I want to make.”
Highly recommend to everyone who’s following their heart in the world, creating their own way and supporting conscious evolution. Elijah now tours globally playing at the worlds biggest consciousness events, and he takes us back in time to talk about some of his doubts and challenges to getting where he is now.
Our topics included…:
– The Power Of The Word (Congruence & Responsibility) [Vid2]
– Following Your Heart & Being A Pioneer [Vid 3]
– Staying Present & Supporting Each Other .. [Vid 4]
– Spontaneity, Fun, Imagination & an Energetic Gift [Vid 5]
My favourite bit is the 5th Video, lol… we go completely out of the box to any traditional ‘interview’ techniques – it’s interesting and fun to say the least.
I’ve been watching the thought of doing these interviews in the back of my mind for a while. I quite often find myself in conversations where Im asking non-traditional questions and pull things out of the field. So, there may be more of these coming. 😉 The intention as outlaid in the first intro vid was not a traditional Q&A but a discourse and exploration of what shows up when we lead from intention.
If you know anyone who could benefit, please share, tag etc. <3 Big thanks to Amel Tresnjic & Dan A'Vard for the audio tech advice 😉 Christine Cole feel you will enjoy the 5th video 😉

This will reach at least 1 person today

This will reach at least 1 person today. You know who you are.
Today is your wake up call.
Askhole.
Quit being an Askhole to your friends and family.
Quit asking for advice yet NEVER using it.
Quit ear-fucking us to death with your dreams and desires for life yet never doing anything about it.
Our ears are worn the fuck out hearing you talk about doing something yet never doing it.
And don’t get us started on all the relationship advice you ask for yet never do anything about. I’ll save that for another post.
#nuffsaid

Washington Post: “The Food and Drug Administration on Thursday asked a drug company to remove its opioid pain medication from the market

Washington Post: “The Food and Drug Administration on Thursday asked a drug company to remove its opioid pain medication from the market, the first time the agency has made such a request because of the public health consequences of abuse.
The agency concluded after an extensive review of Endo Pharmaceuticals’ Opana ER that the “benefits of the drug may no longer outweigh its risks.” The company reformulated the drug in 2012 to make it more difficult to snort, but the FDA said that move actually led to more injections — and a major HIV outbreak.
FDA Commissioner Scott ­Gottlieb, who has pledged to take “more forceful” steps to curb the nation’s opioid epidemic, said the agency’s action reflects its increased focus on the risks posed by the illicit use of opioids. The FDA “is looking broadly at the whole policy framework” used for the painkillers, he said Thursday.
The medication was approved in 2006 for moderate to severe pain when a round-the-clock painkiller is needed.
During the drug’s reformulation, Endo introduced a coating designed to deter people from crushing and snorting the medication.
Play Video 5:27
Users of opioid painkillers often grapple with risking addiction or living with pain
Respondents who took part in The Washington Post-Kaiser Family Foundation survey on long-term, opioid painkiller use share their experiences of living with pain. (Monica Akhtar, Erin Patrick O’Connor/The Washington Post)
But the FDA declined to give it an “abuse deterrent” label, saying the data didn’t support such a designation.
The FDA said Thursday that subsequent data showed a “significant shift” in the route of abuse “from nasal to injection” after the reformulation.
Increased needle-sharing of the drug has since been linked to serious blood disorder cases in Tennessee in 2012 and a 2015 outbreak of HIV and hepatitis C in Indiana, officials said.
[Health officials vow to develop drugs to curb the opioid crisis]
In March, an FDA advisory committee voted, in an 18-to-8 decision, that the benefits of the reformulated Opana ER no longer outweighed the risks it posed.
“The abuse and manipulation of reformulated Opana ER by injection has resulted in a serious disease outbreak,” Janet Woodcock, the director of the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said in a statement Thursday. “When we determined that the product had dangerous unintended consequences, we made a decision to request its withdrawal from the market.”
If the company declines to remove the product, the FDA will take steps to formally require its removal by withdrawing agency approval.
Increased needle-sharing of opioid has been linked to serious blood disorder cases a outbreak of HIV and hepatitis C, officials said. (AP)
In a statement, the company said it was reviewing the FDA’s request but that it “remains confident in the body of evidence established through clinical research demonstrating that Opana ER has a favorable risk-benefit profile when used as intended in appropriate patients.”
Michael Botticelli, director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy for nearly three years under President Barack Obama, said the FDA action is “a real encouraging step. It sounds as if the FDA is using expanded criteria in the way they look at opioids.”
[House panel probes drug distributors and DEA amid national opioid problem]
The agency has been criticized in the past for examining the safety and effectiveness of individual opioid painkillers without considering the wider effects each could have on the nation’s epidemic.
“This falls in line, I think, with their recently released guidance on how they were going to think of drugs and drug approval,” Botticelli said.
From 2000 to 2015, nearly 180,000 Americans died of overdoses of prescription opioids, and tens of thousands more have succumbed to heroin and fentanyl overdoses as the crisis has evolved.
Opana ER brought in $158 million in sales last year for Endo, a 10 percent drop from 2015 because of generic competition, according to FiercePharma, a trade site. The company, which is based in Dublin and has its U.S. headquarters in Malvern, Pa., recently announced two rounds of job cuts.”

Do not mistake admission rate for severity of opioid problems

Do not mistake admission rate for severity of opioid problems. Poorer states have the ER’s “treat and street” (I.e. never admit the patient). States with more comprehensive substance abuse programs as endpoints tend to be more likely to admit.
———-
Washington Post: “The coast-to-coast opioid epidemic is swamping hospitals, with government data published Tuesday showing 1.27 million emergency room visits or inpatient stays for opioid-related issues in a single year.
The 2014 numbers, the latest available for every state and the District of Columbia, reflect a 64 percent increase for inpatient care and a 99 percent jump for emergency room treatment compared to figures from 2005. Their trajectory likely will keep climbing if the epidemic continues unabated.
The report, released by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), puts Maryland at the very top of the national list for inpatient care. The state, already struggling with overdoses from heroin and prescription opioids, has seen the spread of the synthetic opioid fentanyl, which can be mixed with heroin or cocaine and is extraordinarily powerful. Gov. Larry Hogan (R) this year declared a state of emergency in response to the crisis.
A state report released this month showed that opioid-related deaths in Maryland had nearly quadrupled since 2010, and deaths from fentanyl had increased 38-fold in the past decade. Baltimore City saw 694 deaths from drug and alcohol-related overdoses in 2016 — nearly two a day, and a stunning spike from 2015, when 393 people died from overdoses.
“We see overdoses in all ethnic groups, in all Zip codes,” said Leana Wen, the city’s health commissioner.
Wen signed an order June 1 making naloxone, the overdose-reversal medication, available over the counter at pharmacies, and she urged residents to obtain it. She said the new numbers showing the surge in hospital visits was not surprising and noted that many people who show up seeking treatment for addiction cannot receive it immediately.
“We are not anywhere close to getting everyone treatment at the time that they are requesting for help,” Wen said.
Trailing Maryland for opioid-related hospitalizations is Massachusetts, followed by the District of Columbia. The AHRQ’s data-driven report does not speculate on why some states have such high rates of hospital admissions. It suggests that people in the most urban places are more likely to be treated in a hospital than those in rural areas — which would indicate that lack of access to medical care is a factor in the uptick in death rates seen in less-urban parts of the country in recent years.
“Our data tell us what is going on. They tell us what the facts are. But they don’t give us the underlying reasons for what we’re seeing here,” said report co-author Anne Elixhauser, a senior research scientist at AHRQ.
The sharpest increase in hospitalization and emergency room treatment for opioids was among people ages 25 to 44, echoing The Washington Post’s recent reporting that found death rates from all causes in that age bracket have gone up nationally since 2010.
The data also show that women are now as likely as men to be admitted to a hospital for inpatient treatment for opioid-related problems. In 2005, there was a significant gap between men and women, with men more likely to be admitted for such treatment. That gap closed entirely by 2014 even as the hospitalization rate rose for both sexes. Men are still more likely than women to be treated at, and released from, hospital emergency departments.
The report identifies big increases in hospitalizations among people older than 65, but Elixhauser said those cases predominantly result from reactions to prescription medication, rather than from overdoses or the use of heroin or other illegal drugs.
Play Video 5:27
Users of opioid painkillers often grapple with risking addiction or living with pain
Respondents who took part in The Washington Post-Kaiser Family Foundation survey on long-term, opioid painkiller use share their experiences of living with pain. (Monica Akhtar, Erin Patrick O’Connor/The Washington Post)
The broad but uneven repercussions of the opioid epidemic emerge through the data. Texas, Nebraska and Iowa, for example, have remarkably low rates of hospital admissions. So do California and Florida. It’s unclear if, when and to what extent the epidemic will surge into places relatively quiet so far, at least compared to hard-hit states in New England and Appalachia.
The researchers used the typical income from a patient’s Zip code to estimate the income range of people affected. The results showed that rates of hospital admission or emergency room visits were higher in poorer neighborhoods but that the increases were uniform between 75 percent and 85 percent across all income ranges.
The top 10 states with the highest rate of opioid-related hospital admissions in 2014 were, in addition to Maryland and Massachusetts: Rhode Island, New York, West Virginia, Connecticut, Washington, Oregon, Illinois and Maine.
The 10 states with the lowest rate of inpatient stays that year were: Iowa, Nebraska, Wyoming, Texas, Kansas, Georgia, South Dakota, Arkansas, South Carolina and Hawaii.
The extremes were stark. Maryland recorded nearly 404 admissions because of opioids per 100,000 residents. In Iowa, the rate was just under 73.

Scientific American: “By Reuters Television & Darren Schuettler

Scientific American: “By Reuters Television & Darren Schuettler
Former pharmaceutical executive Martin Shkreli has congratulated a group of Australian students who reproduced the active ingredient for a life-saving, anti-parasitic drug at the center of a drug-price controversy involving his former company.
The students from Sydney Grammar School drew global media attention this week after they said they had produced the drug Daraprim for about $2 a dose, a fraction of the current list price of $750 per dose.
Shkreli is a former chief executive of Turing Pharmaceuticals, where he sparked outrage among patients and U.S. lawmakers for raising the price of Daraprim by more than 5,000 percent.
“These Australian students are proof that the 21st century economy will solve problems of human suffering through science and technology,” Shkreli said in a video message posted on YouTube.
Martin Shkreli, left, former CEO of Turing Pharmaceuticals, leaves a House Oversight and Government Reform Committee in Rayburn Building on ‘methods and reasoning behind recent drug price increases,’ after invoking his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination on February 4, 2016. Credit: Tom Williams Getty Images
By Reuters Television & Darren Schuettler
Former pharmaceutical executive Martin Shkreli has congratulated a group of Australian students who reproduced the active ingredient for a life-saving, anti-parasitic drug at the center of a drug-price controversy involving his former company.
The students from Sydney Grammar School drew global media attention this week after they said they had produced the drug Daraprim for about $2 a dose, a fraction of the current list price of $750 per dose.
Shkreli is a former chief executive of Turing Pharmaceuticals, where he sparked outrage among patients and U.S. lawmakers for raising the price of Daraprim by more than 5,000 percent.
“These Australian students are proof that the 21st century economy will solve problems of human suffering through science and technology,” Shkreli said in a video message posted on YouTube.
Martin Shkreli, a former chief executive of Turing Pharmaceuticals, drew outrage for raising the price of malaria medication Daraprim by 5,000 percent. When Australian students said they had experimentally produced the drug for just $2 a dose, Shkreli initially derided their efforts in the above tweets—but he later that said the media had misrepresented his tweets, and released a YouTube video praising the students. Source: @MartinShkreli
“We should congratulate these students for their interest in chemistry and I’ll be excited about what is to come in this STEM-focused 21st century,” he said, referring to science, technology, engineering and mathematics.
Daraprim is used to fight parasitic infections in AIDS patients, pregnant women and others.
The six students and their science teacher worked under the guidance of the University of Sydney and members of the Open Source Malaria consortium, which allows scientists to share research on anti-malaria drugs.
“We had to repeat a lot of the reactions and try different reaction conditions in order to see which materials in which things would react to make the Daraprim,” student Brandon Lee told Reuters Television on Friday.
Turing made front-page headlines after it bought the rights to Daraprim in August 2015. With no rival manufacturers making the drug, Turing quickly raised the price for a tablet of Daraprim to $750 from $13.50.
Overnight, the tiny company was vilified as an example of pharmaceutical industry greed, drawing fire from politicians and medical groups. Turing later said it would cut the cost of the drug to hospitals.
Lee said the students wanted to show that “these compounds which you think are only accessible to these large, large-scale companies are actually able to be accessed and produced by ordinary citizens”.
Shkreli stepped down as Turing’s chief executive in December 2015 after being indicted on charges that he engaged in a Ponzi-like scheme at a hedge fund and Retrophin Inc, a company he once headed. He has pleaded not guilty.”